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‘Creating’ the future – or ‘discovering’ the future?

IMG_2828I was lucky enough to be invited last week to a meeting of the Scottish Institute for Business Leaders (SIBL).  Over the past 15 years, Drew Pryde has built this organisation into an extremely valuable mix of leadership development, combining learning from others (using outside speakers) with a flow of action learning and peer group reflection.  (Anyone who joined one of our EDGe groups or SFCT chapter meetings will be familiar with the general idea!)

The speaker on this occasion was Lance Ramsay (pictured with me above), until very recently General Manager of the Bakerloo line on London Underground, who spoke about “Key Insights in Transformation and Leadership”.  Lance has been at the sharp end of a number of transformation programmes with London Transport and TfL, and he was keen to explore the distinctions between ‘change’ and ‘transformation’.

There were various views in the room about this (of course).  Lance came up with a very interesting possibility – that change is motivated by the past, whereas transformation happens from the future, using the energy of a new possibility to create something not just ‘better’ but in some way fresh.  Lance put up this statement:

“Transformation – the business of reinventing an organisation from the perspective of a future point with an aim to change culture, values, beliefs and behaviours, and discover (rather than create) a new way of working.”

My eye was very much caught by the last piece of this definition – ‘discover rather than create’ a new way of working.  I think this is worth a closer look.

In some philosophies of change the future can be ‘created’. This phrase crops up all over the place – I think I might have first seen it in Peter Senge’s The Fifth Discipline in the early 1990s.  It seems to me to come from a re-engineering perspective, where the future is ours to create in whatever image we wish.  It’s a bold idea, of course, and at least invites us to a position where we have some role in building a future for ourselves rather than it just happening to us.  (This was a dominant view in previous ages – we’re just watching series two of The Crown on Netflix, which is all about ‘doing your duty and making the best of it’ in the 1950s.)

What’s wrong with the idea of ‘creating the future’ – at least from an emergent systems perspective – is that there are so many unknowables and uncertainties along the way.  We can set off with hope in our hearts (very important) and then so many things can happen, out of our control or influence, that set us off track.  Or perhaps they set us onto a different track?  Henry Mintzberg wrote about the difference between ‘designed’ and emergent’ strategy decades ago, and it seems that this distinction is still an important learning point for the new leaders emerging today.

What’s even more interesting here is the use of the alternative verb ‘discover’ the future way of working.  Discovery implies that we don’t know about it beforehand… that there will surprises and unexpectedness, that there may be novel delights and newly significant differences.  This seems to me to be much more in the spirit of emergent change processes in general, and of solution-focused (SF) processes in particular.  In fact, many of our SF conversations are about how might you notice that things are transformed, rather than what will you DO to transform them.  The whole process is one of discovery and iteration – Lance Ramsay was very keen to stress the importance of iterating and keeping going.

Some uses of the word ‘discover’ imply that something was there all the time – we say that Alexander Fleming ‘discovered’ penicillin, which is to say that he was able to find it, notice its properties and make use of them.  Presumably the penicillin mouldy fungus was already around – but not known, seen or identified for what it was.  In the case of organisational transformation, I don’t think it works like this. The new ways of working we discover were always possibilities – albeit outside our mainstream awareness.  In this case, the possibilities emerge into some kind of actuality over time and with iteration, rather like a sculpture emerges from a block of granite or a painting onto a canvas.

The kind of noticing in which I like to engage my clients is a very creative noticing. It’s hard to notice something before we are aware of the possibility of a distinction, and so having language around possible distinctions is a key part of helping this process along.  French scientist Louis Pasteur said ‘In the field of observation, change favours only the prepared mind’, and the twin elements of preparation and observation seem to go hand in hand.  So when we set out to discover the future, knowing which clues to look for is an important component.

It’s well worth thinking more about the possibilities inherent in the ‘discover the future’ paradigm.  What might you discover at work tomorrow? And who might you invite to help you?

Mark IEC (49)Mark McKergow PhD MBA is an international speaker, author, and consultant.  He is director of SFWork, the Centre for Solutions Focus at Work, based in Edinburgh, Scotland.  His latest book is Host: Six new rules roles of engagement for teams, organisations, communities and movements (Solutions Books, 2014). 

 

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New book chapter ‘Appreciative Leadership’

inspiring-leadershipI am very delighted to announce that there is a new leadership book on the scene!  ‘Inspiring Leadership’ has been written by a group of the Ashridge faculty, taking in different aspects of contemporary leadership thinking and scholarship with particular connection to leading in a VUCA (volative, uncertain, complex, ambiguous) world.  And it includes a chapter on Appreciative Leadership from Mike Brent and me!

This chapter brings together different aspects of appreciative traditions, and includes some very practical ideas about how to stay appreciative in tough times, as well as the benefits of doing so.  The chapter draws on Appreciative Inquiry and Positive Psychology as well as Solutions Focus.  As a taster here is one short extract, about using one single word – “Suppose”:

__________________

Suppose…

This is a very useful word in the leader’s vocabulary.  “Suppose” is a word which invites people into a different world – one where things are a little different.  Exploring this different world can illuminate all kinds of possibilities.  It is a two-syllable gateway to creativity, an invitation to join in a discussion on a different basis to the usual everyday real-world need for facts and accuracy.

Another way to think about this is in terms of using the term, “What if….”

As in saying, for example, What if something was different – what would we do then?  This is a useful thing to do when the way ahead is unclear, and new ideas are needed.

  • “What if… we had double the budget, what would we spend it on?”
  • “What if… we had no money at all next month, how might we keep going?”
  • What if… we found a way to get instant customer feedback?”

These are all invitations to explore an alternative reality, to extend our thinking and to draw people together in a novel way.

Some people worry that by asking “Suppose” or “What if”, they are implying that the thing might (or even must) happen.  This is of course not the case – as long as you make it clear why we are supposing something.

(The next section gives practical down-to-earth tips on how to do this!)

______________

I hope you will want to check out the book, with this chapter as well as many other fascinting contributions.  See the book on Google Books, or check it out on Amazon.  There is a Kindle edition available which also saves money.  Here is the complete contents list:

 

New paper: “Brief Therapy: Focused Description Development

With Chris Iveson of BRIEF, I have published a paper which seeks to set out a new focus for the way solution-focused (SF) practice has developed and will continue to develop.  Here is the abstract:

We present a potential new view of solution focused brief therapy (SFBT), based on the development of descriptions in therapy conversations. This version of SFBT leaves out many accepted aspects of the model, so far, including: tasks, end of session compliments, exceptions to the problem and compliments.  We address the issue of theory in solution focused practice and make a distinction between theory as mechanism and explanation – a ‘scientific’ approach, and more philosophical theory which can act as a useful guide to attention for practitioners. We point to potential connections between this view of SF work and recent developments in the field of enactive cognition and post-Wittgensteinian philosophy of mind, including narrative philosophy.

The paper is published as

Iveson, C. and McKergow, M. (2016). Journal of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, Vol 2, No 1, 1-17

And what’s more, you can read it online at

https://www.academia.edu/29994029/Brief_Therapy_Focused_Description_Development.

Comments please!

The huge power of small steps

martinrutteLast week I took part in a fascinating online summit.  Canadian colleague Martin Rutte had invited many transformational and inspirational leaders to discuss the topic of ‘Heaven On Earth’ with him.  Those who know me well will know that this kind of overblown (to British ears at least) talk usually doesn’t excite me – but I’ve known Martin for many years and am keen to support his work.

Martin invited me to talk with him about the power of small steps.  What emerged in our 40 minute conversation amazed us both: a clear, insightful and energizing look at exactly HOW a small step can be so powerful.  We covered how small steps work, and I produced a new model of ‘5 Ways To Recognize A Great Small Step’ to help the listeners put together some impactful steps for themselves.

Great news – this recording is now available here for download.  It’s free, and you don’t have to give any details – just download, listen, enjoy and learn.  And if you like it, sign up here for more blogs on the subject of solution-focused (SF) coaching and practice.

Just to let you know, the recording is so great that Peter Szabo (author of Brief Coaching For Lasting Solutions with Insoo Kim Berg herself) emailed me four times WHILE he was listening to it!  So join us now and make some great small steps in your own life.

Update 22 November 2016: You can also download a transcript of the conversation (which will take less time to read than listening to it!).

The small print: This interview is part of the Co-Creating Heaven On Earth Event a free online event featuring innovative luminaries offering insights and practices for creating a true Heaven On Earth. For more information, please visit http://heavenonearthsummit.com/. This recording is a copyright of The Shift Network. All rights
reserved.

 

Solution Focused and dialogic OD – a great partnership

dialogic-od

Dialogic Organization Development: The Theory and Practice of Transformational Change

Gervase R. Bushe and Robert J. Marshak (editors)

Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2015, 496 pages, ISBN 978-1626564046, £45.89 hardback (Kindle edition available)

Review by Mark McKergow

Even though solution-focused (SF) practice has its roots in therapy, it has for some years been increasingly used in the field of coaching, team coaching and organisational development (OD). The first two of these area have been the subject of a lot of attention and several books, many of them reviewed in this journal over the years. The area of OD has received less attention in the SF world.

Even though SF offers both a lens to look at OD (every case is different, focus on language, take small steps, do more of what work whatever that turns out to be) and a way to do OD (using familiar SF tools like scaling, future perfect etc), there have been relatively few reports of large-scale SF organisational change work. The Solutions Focus Working casebook from the SOLWorld community (McKergow and Clarke, 2007) and interviews with Susanne Burgstaller (McKergow, 2015) and John Pelton (Brooker, 2015) show this kind of work in action, and Susanne Burgstaller’s book Lösungsfokus in Organisationen: Zukunftsorientiert beraten und führen (Burgstaller, 2015, still only available in German) is an excellent introduction for those lucky enough to be able to read it.

So why am I telling you all this at the start of a review of another book – Gervase Bushe and Bob Marshak’s excellent and ground-breaking Dialogic OD? Because Bushe and Marshak are both aware of SF work as a dialogic (as opposed to diagnostic) practice, and have produced a remarkable collection of chapters which sets the move from diagnostic to dialogic work into a much bigger OD context. The opening chapter lists some 40 different strands of dialogic OD work, from the familiar (Appreciative Inquiry, Open Space, World Café) through historic (talking stick, Stafford Beer), to the emerging (Art of Hosting, Theory U). And, to my delight, they have included Solution-Focused Dialogue in their list. So many lists of these practices seem to miss our community, and it’s very refreshing to see SF up there with the others.

The 17 chapters in the book range through introductions to dialogic practice (with helpful tables showing distinctions from diagnostic practice), and both theoretical and practical elements. The theory comes from the likes of Frank Barrett (known to me for his work on improvisation and jazz along with Appreciative Inquiry) and Ralph Stacey (whose complex responsive process framework connects well with our idea of turn-taking and turn-making in conversations). All these chapters have a nice ‘starting from first principles’ feel to them. The authors have usually written much before on these topics, but here they start at the beginning without assuming familiarity – which makes the book an exceptional primer. To give an example, this is a juicy and relevant snippet from Frank Barrett’s chapter ‘Social Constructionist Challenge to Representational Knowledge’ about the link between knowledge and action:

Plato and the Enlightenment philosophers held that the highest form of knowledge is contemplation. In that view, we contemplate and then we act. But social constructionists propose that the arrow is reversed. We act into the world, we engage with things we care about, and then reflect or contemplate. Knowledge is an activity rather than an internal representation. (p.70)

What a pithy and relevant statement! The book is crammed with insights and pieces such as these which, while not new, make clear and helpful connections between the thinking behind dialogic work and the way it comes into practice.

The second and longer part of the book is concerned with practice. The chapter by Tova Averbuch on ‘Entering, Readiness and Contracting for Dialogic OD’ is outstandingly useful. Averbuch looks squarely at all the practical difficulties in engaging with clients who may be more accustomed to dialogic work, with greater alleged certainty of process and outcome. She shows different ways to engage with both the situation and the stakeholders, build connection and trust, make contracts and even how to bill when the work appears uncertain and emergent. This is not a cheap book, but for those engaged professionally in OD work this chapter alone provides great value.

I was particulary interested to read Chris Corrigan’s chapter on ‘Hosting and Holding Containers’ with its potential connections to my work on host leadership. Corrigan is a long-term expert on thinking about hosting conversation, but as in the theoretical chapters he too holds this expertise lightly and starts from the beginning. A container in this case is not, of course, a Tupperware box but is rather a combination of topic, group, facilitator/host and boundaries. Careful thinking about how these elements interact can make all the difference between effective work and a complete mess, and Corrigan brings the topic to life with stories connecting to initiating, building stability, supporting inquiry and finally ending a container. One simple tip – “If it’s about us, don’t do it without us” gives a flavour of the work here.

There is not space here to go into all 17 chapters. Each one has its own topic and flavour, and the whole work comes together as a unit with Bushe and Marshak’s careful curating and editing. There is also a website, http://www.dialogicod.net/, with resources, articles and details of the book. If you’re engaged in OD and want to think broadly about your work, this is the most important book to appear for many years – a very bold move in a field which has been emerging for decades and yet seems now to becoming more formed and confident.

References
Brooker, J. (2015). Achieve Tough Targets: John Pelton on using Solution Focus to achieve a tough target and resolve a difficult challenge at HS2. InterAction: The journal of Solution Focus in organisations Vol 7 No 2 pp 97-103
Burgstaller, S. (editor) (2015). Lösungsfokus in Organisationen: Zukunftsorientiert beraten und führen. Heidelberg: Carl Auer
McKergow, M. (2015). From diagnosis to dialogue in Organisational Development: Interview with Susanne Burgstaller. InterAction: The journal of Solution Focus in organisations Vol 7 No 2 pp 104-110
McKergow, M. and Clarke, J. (2007). Solutions Focus Working: 80 real-life lessons for successful organisational change. Cheltenham: Solutions Books

The power of “yet….”

The RSA in London have just released another of their wonderful RSA Animate videos – short talks by key researchers set to customised animations drawn apparently in real time by the ‘hairy hand’.  The latest features Carol Dweck speaking on ‘How to help every child fulfil their potential’.

Dweck is well-know for her work on the difference between treating intelligence with a ‘fixed mindset’ (intelligence is fixed at birth) or a ‘growth mindset’ (intelligence develops and changes).  This video gives an excellent summary of her ideas and research.

Towards the end of the video, Dweck speaks about the power of the word ‘yet…’.  One of the schools she mentioned doesn’t give ‘failing’ students a ‘Fail’ grade – instead they get a ‘Not Yet’ grade.  I’ve been teaching this in my accelerated learning workshops since the 1990s, and there is a very solution-focused flavour to the idea.

I think it’s about presuppositions.  ‘You’ve failed’ sounds like a statement of fact, once and for all.  ‘You haven’t passed yet…’ is much more grounded in the now, and has the presupposition that you might and indeed will pass – in the future.  The same phrase can then lead into a conversation about what will happen in between now and passing.  It’s so simple to try, and can make such a difference.

Now enjoy the RSA Animate film of Carol Dweck:

 

“Root cause” and solution-focused practice

I haverootcause just started the sixth running of my Solution Focused Business Professional course with the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.  In the first week, a very interesting question came up from a participant about root cause analysis and what would SF do instead.  I thought you might be interested to read it.

Hi Mark,

I have a question about SF not focusing on root causes of problems (or please correct me if I am mistaken). In intervention research we often look at root causes of problems in order to develop interventions to alleviate social ills. So – if I look at organizations, sometimes there may be a root cause of a problem – such as a mentally unstable leader that leads to significant issues (I know of an organization where the unstable leader would sometimes be rude to major clients in meetings). With SF, I would imagine folks would think of ways to address how to win the clients back, rather than look at the root cause of the problem – i.e., the leader. Likewise, the staff would be creating a lot of extra work having to regain the relationships with clients on an ongoing basis as long as the leader was in his/her position.

Might you speak to how SF would approach the above situation? Thanks so much.

Excellent question!  There are a number of points to be made.

1.  We are sceptical of the whole idea of a ‘root cause’ in complex/social systems.  While this idea works well in mechanical systems, the many inter-relating interactions and dependancies in a complex system mean that trying to find a single cause is a doomed effort – there is so much going on, and it changes all the time so what’s the case today may well be different tomorrow.

2.  Even if you think you’ve found such a root cause, it brings with it an element of blame and accusation.  In your example it’s all the rude leader’s fault.  While this may certainly be a part of the situation, it leads us down a route to thinking that this is the sole cause and that therefore we have to focus on getting the leader to stop being rude. This then appears to be a ‘magic bullet’.  Two practical problems – firstly, the rude leader may well not appreciate this attention (and will probably get ruder, especially towards staff members bringing them this news).  Second and much worse, it takes our attention away from other possibilities, other people and other routes.

3.  SF embraces the ideas of complex systems and emergence – so there are no magic bullets, things emerge a step at a time, and focus on what everyone WANTS as opposed to what is wrong.  So, while there may be a rude leader, what do they and everyone else want?  This takes the inquiry down a completely different line.  So the first step of an SF inquiry on your example would be to gently ask the various people want they want from these client meetings.  It would be very interesting to hear what everyone including the rude leader said!  Then we can go from there.

4.  As we will see in week 4, the idea of a Platform and a ‘customer for change’ is crucial here. Who wants something different?  If the ‘rude leader’ wants something different we can work with them.  If they don’t but others do (such as the staff who have to do extra work) then we work with them.  If the latter, then we start to look at when they get the thing they want (even a little) and what helps to do that.  So, it may be that someone notices that the rude leader is more polite in the afternoons (let’s say) – in which case a small step might be to start to hold more of these meetings in the afternoon and see what happens. 

Cheers, Mark

 

My new book Host is published today!

Today’s the day! After eleven years of work, interviews, workshops, discussions and writing sessions, my host leadership book is published. The book, written with Helen Bailey, presents a fascinating and practical exploration of leading as a host, leading up to our six new roles (not rules) of engagement.Host cover 2

“A genuinely new view of leadership – practical and profound.”  – Jack Canfield

Buy your copy now at amazon.com (http://amzn.to/YHbDPJ) or amazon.co.uk (http://amzn.to/1tdSv3Y). It’s available in Kindle as well as print – you could be reading it in a few seconds time.

Join us both for our live tweet chat this evening Monday 6 October at 7pm-8pm UK time, #HostLeaderHour. And also follow us @thehostleader.

Our first online course in Host Leadership starts Wednesday 5 November for seven weeks – more news about that soon. In the meantime please enjoy the book and share your thoughts with the Host Leadership community at http://hostleadership.ning.com.

Björn Johansson

Many readers of this blog will know my good friend and colleague BjImageorn Johansson, who runs the Clues centre in Karlstad, Sweden with his partner Eva Persson.  I visited Björn and Eva in Karlstad yesterday. Some of you may know that Björn has not been well in recent months. What was originally thought to be disc pain in the back has turned out after many weeks of agony to be cancerous tumours of the type adeno carcinoma. For the last 80 days Björn has been in hospital, and Eva has been living there too during the past weeks to help and care for him.

Now at last Björn is showing signs of responding to new medication. We are hoping that he may get strong enough to return home for the summer. This could also mean the possibility of chemotherapy treatment, which his immune system is currently too weak to take. There is no guarantee that even this will help. Bjorn cannot even walk at the moment – months in bed means that his leg muscles have wasted away, though he is starting physiotherapy to regain strength and is being very well cared for.

There is no recovery prognosis. Björn has somewhere between two and six months to live, at best. He is 48 years old. He is lucky to have a wonderful family who have found ways to put their lives on hold to be with him. Their joint goal is now to make the coming months ‘the best summer of all’ for Björn.

How could you contribute to this? Send an email or even an old fashioned card to Björn with some words of appreciation, support and fellowship. What stands out for you – his contributions to SOLWorld from the very start (and even before), his hundreds of workshops, his work across Sweden and around the world, the exciting Karlstad group meetings, the SF summit, the Swedish SFCT chapter, the mop-scaling process set out in the Solutions Focus Working case book, even the classic ‘Björn’ exercise in threes (“Out of all the things you’re doing at work at the moment…”)… he and Eva have of course stepped back from organising the SOLWorld 2014 conference. If he gets home there may be possibilities to visit if you can.

You may want to reply here, and I urge you to send something personal too. Please do not expect an instant reply – Björn has not been strong enough to even read email, but Eva will help to pass on your messages.  Send things by email to bjorn@clues.se, or by mail to
Långmyrsgatan 8,
65469 Karlstad
Sweden

Update 7 June 2014: I received this update yesterday from Eva at the hospital

Dear Mark / Jenny

We are still at the hospital and it has been both up and downs since last time. New infections, more than 2 liter in on of the lung again, and the tumor on the left  kidney grows so the kidney is not working at all. BUT he has been out of the bed, tried to take some small steps around the bed : ) AND they plan to start chemotherapy next week, if no more complications will come., in order to try to reduce pain and tumors. So that is very very good news! We still dont now when he can come home, but i hope and think it will bee in two weeks time ( I have said that a couple of times now so this time I think it will happened). It still comes a lot of nice e-mails and post cards!!! we are so grateful and thanks Mark for pass on our greetings. We have put all the e-mails and cards on the wall so it reminds us that we have a lot of friends out there waiting for Bjorn. He have a plan to respond to everyone when he have the strength! We would like you to say something about that: how much we appreciate the response and it keep us buzzy to read all those good stories how to make the best summer ever that so many have shared! So even if we now are not able to answer we are following whats is going on and it makes a different for us!

Update 30 June 2014:  Message sent to SOLUTIONS-L and SFT-L lists

I am very sorry to have to let you know that Björn Johansson died at 5.30am yesterday, Sunday 29 June 2014.  He was 48 years old.  Eva was with him at his bedside.

Eva has asked me to let you know that the both appreciated all the cards, emails and love which came in so many ways.   A humanist funeral is being arranged for Thursday 17 July in Karlstad, followed by a gathering at the Clues centre.   For those would would like to send something to Eva and the family, the address is Långmyrsgatan 8, 65469 Karlstad, Sweden

I started drafting this email to say that ‘Björn is no longer with us’.  Except, of course, that he is – in his work, his writing, his ideas, his developments, his family and in all his interactions.  Ken Gergen wrote (in his paper in InterAction Vol 5 No 1) that we carry everyone we have every met as a sort of potential – ‘relational residuals’.  Some we use more than others.  I am proud to carry Björn with me.

Solution Focused evaluation – a summary from New Zealand

ProgressI am just about to start the fifth Solutions Focus Business Professional online course with the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.  UWM was the place where Steve de Shazer and Insoo Kim Berg ran online courses, and I was very honoured indeed to be invited to join the team there to present at 16 week online course aimed at managers, coaches and consultant.

One of the participants on the last course was one Lucy McKergow… (full disclosure, yes, she is related!), who works in New Zealand helping farmers with water policy and other issues.  As part of the course we looked at Solution Focused evaluation and performance reviews. Lucy posted this summary of the differences between a normal review and an SF one:

Conventional SF
After the event – focused on the past Can be used before (future), during (present) or after (past) an event
Typically asks about content or the trainer’s competency Focus is participant evaluating their own progress
Asks for general comments – often left blank Focused on ‘what’s better’
Might ask what participants didn’t like about the training Always solution focused
Might not include time or space for reflection Grounded in reflection and elements of conversation – comments, stories, metaphors
Seen as a drag or an after-thought Motivational, energising – it’s about the participant’s individual progress
Learning finishes with course Learning loop entered during course and continues after the course through noticing progress
Criteria set by trainer Criteria set by participants during conversation (or questionnaire with participants setting criteria)
Typically uses a Likert-type scale to assess feelings about criteria (as set out by trainer) Uses ‘what’s better’ or scaling to measure progress

That’s an outstanding summary of what makes SF reviews both effective – in terms of building better future performance – and engaging for the participants.  Great work, Lucy!

For more details of the online course including topics, how it works and quotes from past participants, click here.

 

 

 

 

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